Solace: Writing, Refuge, & LGBTQ Women of Color

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How do you define solace and where do you give it, find it, take it, share it? Solace: Writing, Refuge, and LGBTQ Women of Color, from BLF Press, anthologizes the voices of thirteen LGBTQ women of color. In the preface, editors S. Andrea Allen and Lauren Cherelle share the impetus for and the importance of assembling this collection, especially in light of anti-LGBT legislation and violence in 2016. 

“As a community, where can we find solace from the microaggression and violence enacted upon us on a daily basis? How do we amass the hope that heals our wounds as we traverse a world that seeks to destroy or repress and suppress us, simply for daring to live our truth? Who dares to shield us from the constant barrage of hatred and disdain that we face in our communities, at our places of employment, in our own families and homes?” (Preface, x-xi)

The authors delve into how, why, and where they find solace and/or make solace for themselves. Broad experiences inform the expressions compiled here. The result is a beautiful, poignant blend of poetry, prose, and photographs. If you’re like me and enjoy the tactile pleasures of a physical copy, the velvety cover and technicolor images will most definitely deliver extra comfort and joy as you read.

In their respective essays, Almah Rice (“Remedios”) and Claudia Moss (“Solace in Words”) reflect on the life-giving sustenance found in the written word. Both writers use wonderful imagery to convey just how integral words are in their lives. Readers who find refuge in and draw inspiration from the world of words will find kindred spirits in Rice and Moss. 

“So I strapped a book’s spine to my own and grew taller, stronger. Yes, words hold me up and still do. Or, I can re-myth the scoliosis I was diagnosed with as a child as an attempt to curve around words, language my trellis.” (Rice, 90)

As we move through life, we are also faced with how we define solace can influence the world around us. Hala Aurangzeb’s piece, “Pummel”, confronts the abusive nature of its subject’s solace. In Eunice Sierra-Gonzalez’s poem “Queer Brown Girl”, solace is offered through shared experience.  

In Kendra N. Bryant’s “A Lesbian Teacher Tries to Teach Compassion”, she encourages her students to engage in critical thinking and discussion regarding race and sexual orientation. Despite the strong backlash against her intentions, she takes solace in the long view. 

“… I’m going to rest in the notion that people will come to understanding when it is time for them to understand.” (Bryant, 32)

Nik Nicholson, librecht baker, M. Shelly Conner, Sheila Tartaglia, Eliana Buenrostro, Mica Standing Soldier, Dr. Nubian Sun, and Imani Sims, contribute nuanced pieces that grow with each reading. They explore layers of solace found within multiple identities; transformation and perseverance; past and present; and beyond.

Solace: Writing, Refuge, & LGBTQ Women of Color encourages all of us to engage in meaningful contemplation and dialogue with ourselves and with each other.

Solace: Writing, Refuge, & LGBTQ Women of Color
Edited by S. Andrea Allen & Lauren Cherelle
Published by BLF Press
Scheduled Release Date: January 31, 2017
Presale: December 1, 2016
ISBN: 978-0-9972439-6-3
ISBN (epub): 978-0-9972439-5-6

Available from BLF PressAmazon, and other retailers. Check with your local public library on how you can recommend titles for addition to the collection.

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Categories: anthology, essay, lgbt, nonfiction, poetry | Tags: , , , | 2 Comments

Buffering by Hannah Hart – audiobook review

hannah-hart-audiobook

Buffering is that time you spend waiting for the pixels of your life to crystallize into a clearer picture; it’s a time of reflection, a time of pause, a time for regaining your composure or readjusting your course.

Hannah Hart, host of “My Drunk Kitchen” on YouTube and author of My Drunk Kitchen: A Guide to Eating, Drinking, and Going with Your Gut (2014), shares her life experiences in her new memoir, Buffering: Unshared Tales of a Life Fully Loaded. Hart infuses her memoir with the warmth and humor that endears her to fans. The author shares her experiences of growing up in California with a fractured family; her struggles with sexuality, self-harm, faith, and fame; and more. Her conversational style of writing made me feel like she was riding in the passenger seat of my car as I commuted. All of the exclamation points, italics, and caps found in the text are brought to life as she reads.

Readers and listeners who have never watched her videos or read her previous book, will still find connection through the trials and triumphs of Hart’s life.

Buffering: Unshared Tales of a Life Fully Loaded
Hannah Hart
Produced by HarperCollins
Length: 5 hours, 59 minutes
ISBN-10: 1441719202
ISBN-13: 978-1441719201
Released: October 2016

Available as an audiobook from AmazonAudible, Barnes & Noble, and Overdrive (check your local public library for availability in both eAudio and CD), as well as many other retailers.

Join the discussion on Goodreads!

***Quotes come minus pagination because I do not have a text copy of the book. Remember rewinding a cassette or CD in an attempt to write down song lyrics? Yep, this was just like that.***

Categories: audiobooks, lgbt, Memoirs & Autobiographies | Tags: , , , | Leave a comment

Not-So-Straight Sue

not-so-straight-sue

Not-So-Straight Sue, the second installment in Cheyenne Blue’s “Girl Meets Girl” series, goes fossicking about the Australian Outback with Sue Brent, a lawyer determined to keep her sexuality under wraps. Despite creating a life in London as a successful lawyer with great friends (Ger and Nora from Never-Tied Nora) – leagues removed from Yeringup, the small town that sent her deep into the closet as a teenager – she still can’t fully live her life. 

The story kicks off when Sue decides that she’s had enough of running from herself. Life in the big city teems with exciting entertainment, career opportunities, and kindred spirits. However, she steps away from a promotion to Senior Associate at the prestigious law firm where she works. Instead, she heads off to substitute at a small, one person practice in Mungabilly Creek, a small town a day’s drive from her hometown. The terrain is full of interesting characters, including the landscape. Felix, a woman living out between towns with her horses, provides potential for rich friendship when Sue first arrives. Mrs. T, housekeeper extraordinaire and all-around amazing woman, anchors the home front. And Moni, an American doctor serving rural areas of Queensland, reconnects with Sue, a handful of years after their first meeting in London. The romance of place and people is blended wonderfully. It’s also a fun distraction.

NSSS is an engrossing, entertaining story about a whole myriad of things, including coming out, rebuilding family relationships, and discovering that what and who you think you know can surprise you…in a good way. 

Recommended reading companions for this volume: a good red wine and a loyal pup.

Not-So-Straight Sue
Author: Cheyenne Blue
Publisher: Ylva Publishing
Publication date: October 2016

Available from Ylva Publishing, AmazonBarnes & Noble, and Overdrive (check your local public library for availability), as well as many other retailers.

Join the discussion on Goodreads!

 

 

 

Categories: family relationships, friendship, lgbt, romance | Tags: , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Eleanor & Hick

Two audiobooks have been released this year about the 30+ year relationship between former First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt and journalist Lorena “Hick” Hickok. The relationship began as a romance and mellowed into a sustaining, supportive friendship.  

Volumes have been written by and about Eleanor and to a more limited extent, you can find writings by and about Hick. Every nook and cranny of Eleanor’s life poured over by historians, journalists, critics, and politicians. Happily, however, these two books contribute to a more complete view of the women behind the personages. I’m miles behind folks, though, since I have only just now got my hot little hands on a copy of Empty Without You, a collection of the letters, annotated by Rodger Streitmatter. I recommend listening to Loving Eleanor and Eleanor and Hick: The Love Affair that Shaped a First Lady. It isn’t necessary to start with one over the other, though. Enjoy!

 

loving-eleanor

 

 Loving Eleanor by Susan Wittig Albert is told with through the framework of a fictional memoir written by Hick and left with the voluminous correspondence she shared with Eleanor (known to her, fondly, as Madam, ER, and Eleanor). The letters were donated to the FDR Presidential Library in Hyde Park, with the provision that they remain sealed until ten years after Hick’s death. Albert, known for The Cottage Tales of Beatrix Potter and mystery series, draws from extensive research to pen a vivid story surrounding the the two women’s romance and friendship. Albert includes information at the end of the story for readers who want to find out more. She also clarifies which parts of the novel are creative license. These additions reflect important truths that were hidden away or reinterpreted by persons who found the letters unpalatable. Albert highlights Doris Faber’s 1980 biography of Hick, which demeans its subject; a result, Albert writes, of Faber’s disapproval and disgust with the relationship revealed by the letters. The novel spans four decades, covering the women’s first meeting prior to FDR’s term as Governor of New York until Hick’s death in 1968. It’s an engrossing read. Told through Hick’s eyes, it takes on an especially personal, candid tone.

Karen White narrates this story with a wonderfully straight forward style suited to the personality of it’s primary voice. Lorena eschewed jewelry for suits; built a successful career as a journalist; and relished solitude, a stark contrast to the life she lived while active and as part of Eleanor’s life. Skilled narrators resist exaggerated imitations of real persons. Eleanor Roosevelt has a very distinctive voice. White’s performance of ER reflects the cadence produced by a patrician upbringing. I enjoyed the depth of her delivery, as the emotional weight of ER’s experiences, hopes, and passions, pour through the speakers.

You can learn more about the authors, narrators, and where to purchase a copy of these audiobooks via the links below.

Loving Eleanor
Author: Susan Wittig Albert
Narrator: Karen White
Produced by Tantor Media
Length: 10.5 hours
Release date: March 22, 2016

Available as an audiobook from AmazonAudible, Barnes & Noble, and Overdrive (check your local public library for availability in both eAudio and CD), as well as many other retailers.

Join the discussion on Goodreads!

 

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eleanor-and-hick

Eleanor and Hick is a sympathetic, well-researched exploration of the relationship between the two women. While not all readers will agree on the weight or interpretation of the materials sources, the book will definitely inspire spirited conversation.Author Susan Quinn delves into primary source material and other resources from collections housed at the FDR Library, the Library of Congress, and universities, in order to present a balanced, informed, and contextual look at the women’s lives together and as individuals. 

Narrator Kimberly Farr delivers a solid performance. Her frank tone, with upticks of emotion for direct quotes, draws out the public and private personas of Eleanor and Hick.

Eleanor and Hick: The Love Affair That Shaped a First Lady
Author: Susan Quinn
Narrator: Kimberly Farr
Produced by Penguin Audio
Length: 13 hours, 44 minutes
Release date: September 27, 2016

Available as an audiobook from AmazonAudible, Audiobooks, Barnes & Noble, and Overdrive (check your local public library for availability in both eAudio and CD), as well as many other retailers.

Join the discussion on Goodreads!

 

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Rodger Streitmatter curated and annotated a collection of letters Hick and Eleanor wrote to each other. He provides important context and discussion of their relationship. Prior to her death in 1968, Hick donated thousands of these letters to the FDR Presidential Library in Hyde Park, New York, with the directive to keep them sealed until ten years after her passing. When the cache became available to researchers, some were dismayed and unsettled by what they discovered. One of Hick’s biographers, Doris Faber, produced a less than favorable book after she read them, according to the author’s note at the end of Loving Eleanor. I’ve just picked up a copy for my own library and look forward to reading them.

Empty Without You
Editor: Rodger Streitmatter
Published by Free Press
Originally published in 1998
Hardcover, paperback, and ebook copies are available. Don’t forget to check with your local public library for availability.

Categories: audiobooks, history, lgbt, Memoirs & Autobiographies, primary sources, romance, romantic friendships | Tags: , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Girl Mans Up – audiobook review

girl-mans-up

Girl Mans Up by M-E Girard tells the story of how Pen, a gender non-conforming teen at a private Catholic high school, learns how to stand up for her truth. On the way she struggles with unhealthy friendships, parental disapproval of her and the older brother she adores, and vile fellow students. Not to mention finding someone who seems to understand, support, and find Pen super irresistible.

Her biggest allies in the story are her older brother, Johnny, and Blake, a kickass, rocking bisexual character who Pen finally works up the nerve to talk to while scooping up girls for her odious friend Colby.

Girl Mans Up continues the discussion on gender presentation. Pen strives to figure out how to stay true to herself in the face of difficult friendships and a combative home life. The novel comes together in the end as a beginning and not an ending. Vague as that statement is, it will make sense when you finish the book!

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As soon as I heard “narrated by Emma Galvin” I pressed pause on the audio sample, too excited to listen to the rest. Emma Galvin has a voice perfect for voicing teens. By random chance, I’ve landed on two audiobooks released this year that are narrated by Galvin. Her voice gives her protagonist a rough and emotional, and living between certainty and uncertainty. The rest of the cast is rich with characterization and it shows in the way certain characters inspire deep loathing.

Accents are a challenge for every narrator. Galvin does a serviceable job as Pen’s parents (immigrants from Portugal) and extended family. I felt like Pen’s mother sounded young, but I come from a line of youthful voices, so I can’t entirely discount her performance based on that. Pen struggles to coexist between the cultures of her Portuguese family and Canadian culture. There is a gap in communication between Pen and her parents, for a number of reasons, including her limited Portuguese language skills and gender identity.

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You can learn more about the authors, narrator, and where to purchase a copy of this audiobook via the links below.

Girl Mans Up
Author: M-E Girard
Narrator: Emma Galvin
Produced by HarperAudio
Length: 9 hours 32 minutes
Release date: September 2016
ISBN: 9780062642868
ISBN-10: 0062642863
ASIN: B01J21ARTG

Available as an audiobook from Amazon, Audible, iTunes, Audiobooks, and Overdrive (check your local public library for availability), as well as many other retailers.

Join the discussion on Goodreads!

Categories: lgbt, young adult | Tags: , | 3 Comments

As I Descended – audiobook review

as i descended.jpg

 

It’s barely fall, but the early mornings are darker and colder. Every sound in an empty room makes me jump a little. Amielynn Abellera’s narration plays a huge role in bringing out the full richness of the story. The eerie atmosphere, setting, and murky moral territory infiltrate every nook and cranny, like fog. As I Descended by Robin Talley draws some inspiration from Shakespeare’s Macbeth. Listening to the story with headphones on in a quiet library intensifies the creep factor. 

I don’t believe in Ouija boards, yet I won’t touch one with a twenty foot pole. The story is a deliciously chill, vicarious thrill for those of us who looked under the bed as a kid. It pulls readers into the supernatural and what happens when a trio of friends — Maria, Lily, and Brandon— lay their hands on an antique Ouija board. Be careful what you wish for and never forget to say goodbye.

What better place to invoke the spirits than a private boarding school on a former plantation in Virginia? Ghost stories involving former tenants are dismissed by students, who enjoy being scared, but that’s about it. Maria, on the other hand, has a secret past with spirits and isn’t so quick to dismiss the tales. The story wastes no time in setting the mood with the initial events in the old cafeteria and doesn’t let up. Since the story is told in the third person, you find yourself inside the heads of the primary and secondary characters. The effect shows the increasing doubt, fear, and isolation the students experience as events unravel. The story includes a diverse cast, with no one person being singled out as a “villain” because of their social status, ethnicity, physical abilities, or sexual orientation. Though, that being said, the story shows high school kids at their best and worst…and worst.

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Amielynn Abellera is perfectly cast as the narrator. Her strong characterizations allow the story to come fully alive. The students that she voices converge on Acheron Academy from different regions in the United States, as well as Puerto Rico. Lily has a soft Southern drawl; Mateo speaks with Spanish accented English. Some students sound stoned, serious, or ditsy. The heights of elation and the depths of fear and despair will crawl under your skin. Abellera’s pacing allows the suspense to build and grab you, but never fully allows you to relax. She doesn’t rush the story or exaggerate her voice for a cheap scare, either.

As I Descended is a great companion for the long, dark nights ahead.

You can learn more about the authors, narrators, and where to purchase a copy of this audiobook via the links below.

As I Descended
Author: Robin Talley
Narrator: Amielynn Abellera
Produced by Harper Collins
Length: 9 hours, 9 minutes
Release date: September 2016
Audio CD: ISBN-10: 1441708952, ISBN-13: 987-1441708953
Digital Audio: ISBN 9780062571823, ISBN-10: 0062571826

Available as an audiobook from AmazonAudible, Audiobooks, and Overdrive (check your local public library for availability in both eAudio and CD), as well as many other retailers.

Join the discussion on Goodreads!

Categories: audiobooks, horror, lgbt, paranormal, retellings, young adult | Tags: , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Here Comes the Sun – audiobook review

here-comes-the-sun

 

In Nicole Dennis-Benn’s novel Here Comes the Sun, Jamaica is not a paradise for everyone. Those with money fly in and stay at expensive resorts, like the Palm Star Resort. The men, women, and children who call the island home live in another world. Margot and her younger sister Thandi, along with their mother Delores, live in the financially impoverished community of Montego Bay. Margot works at Palm Star Resort and offers its customers a sanitized pleasure-scape. She trades her body for money to provide a better life for her sister and for her own deferred dreams. On stolen nights, she steals a piece of love for herself at Verdene’s home. After years in London, Verdene returns to Jamaica and finds herself on the outside. Thandi struggles to live up to the high expectations of her family and her own self-image. 

When a new resort threatens to destroy Montego Bay and its residents, long-held secrets and desires spill over. Here Comes the Sun illuminates a world of compromises, lost innocence, and love in hard places. How far would you go for the people you love? How much of yourself would you push below the surface? Each woman will make difficult choices and discover for themselves where to draw the line in the sand. 

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Bahni Turpin delivers stunning, immersive performances as Margot, Thandi, Dolores, and the rest of the Islanders. Her characterizations of the people who inhabit Jamaica are so vivid that I feel like I’m leaving a conversation midway when I turn my car off. The accents she uses convey what parts of the island, socioeconomic, and life experiences the people inhabit. The rhythms of the community flow from the region’s patois, which Nicole Dennis-Benn uses for the novel’s dialogue. Turpin brings the language to life in a way that as a reader I would not do justice.

The way in which the women speak to each other changes depending on the person they are talking to and the role they assume. Thandi consciously moves between her two worlds – the expensive private high school she attends and the economically disadvantaged Montego Bay – by switching back and forth from the studied tones of her wealthier peers to the dialect of her home neighborhood. Verdene, a woman who has returned to Jamaica after living in London for several years, has a complex accent. Her voice is a blend of her homeland, the high level of education she received, and the British English she steeped in during her life abroad. Her neighbors treat her like an outcast, a witch with sexual appetites to avoid. The elderly woman next door leaves dead animals and noisy, high-pitched Biblical condemnations. 

The sun never sets on this listening experience.

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You can learn more about the authors, narrators, and where to purchase a copy of this audiobook via the links below.

Here Comes the Sun
Author: Nicole Dennis-Benn
Narrator: Bahni Turpin 
Produced by HighBridge Audio
Length: 11.75 hours
Release date: July 19, 2016
Audio CD ISBN: 9781681682709
Digital Audio ISBN: 9781681682716

Available as an audiobook from Audible, Barnes & Noble, iTunes, and Overdrive (check your local public library for availability in both eAudio and CD), as well as many other retailers.

Join the discussion on Goodreads!

Categories: lgbt, literary fiction | Tags: , , , , | 1 Comment

Check out my review of “You’re The Most Beautiful Thing That Happened” by Arisa White at The Lesbrary

Arisa White’s newest poetry collection, You’re the Most Beautiful Thing That Happened, plumbs the depths of what it means to exist in the world as queer, female, a person of color, and beyond. She undresses a multitude of topics, including race, family, and relationships. The collection offers tender, tumultuous, and light moments. In the introduction, […]

via Julie Thompson reviews You’re The Most Beautiful Thing That Happened by Arisa White — The Lesbrary

Categories: lgbt, poetry | Tags: , , | Leave a comment

GRNW 2016 – Read the Rainbow

The Gay Romance Northwest (GRNW) 2016 conference only 3 weeks away. It will be held at the Seattle Public Library on Saturday, September 24th from 12 pm to 6pm, plus an after party. Registration is required to attend panel sessions, but all are welcome to peruse the books for sale and chat up authors. If you want to pre-funk for the conference, I’ve included a list of the attending authors and panelists, as well as links to their websites and books.

I’m super excited not only to attend my first book conference, but one that focuses on LGBTQIA+ romance! A friend and I are arriving early so that we can score some seriously awesome swag. 

 

Love-Between-the-Covers

 

I also highly recommend watching “Love Between the Covers“, a romance documentary featuring numerous writers, including Radclyffe. You can watch it via Amazon, Vudu, YouTube, and Google Play. You can also watch it for free if your library subscribes to Hoopla or has DVD copies available. 

 

 

If you haven’t visited the Seattle Public Library before, make sure you take time to look around and visit their Friends of the Library store. It’s candyland for bibliophiles. When I went down to check out the Shakespeare Folio exhibit, I ended up dumping a good chunk of my paycheck at their store. All for a good cause, right? 😀

Thus far, the only author on the list that I’ve read is Sheri Lewis Wohl (Necromantia is a fantastic mystery with supernatural elements and romance. I highly recommend it!). It’s a daunting challenge to read even a quarter of this list before September 24th; my TBR pile on Goodreads will be flush with new-to-me titles! Most excellent! I will definitely read as many summaries as I can squeeze in and then take the slow route of enjoyment over the next few months. Attending the event is going to be a great way to meet authors and fellow readers.

 

Washington State

Astrid Amara
Science Fiction, Fantasy, Romance

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Austin Chant
Romance, Fantasy

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Laylah Hunter
Science Fiction, Fantasy

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Amanda Jean
Romance

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Eric Andrews-Katz
Contemporary Romance, Adventure

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Nicole Kimberling
Science Fiction, Fantasy, Mystery

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AK Rose
Romance

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Tracy Timmons-Gray
Event Coordinator for GRNW

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Sheri Lewis Wohl
Romance, Paranormal

Oregon

Jove Belle
Romance, Thriller & Suspense, Erotica

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Charley Descoteaux
Romance

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EJ Russell
Contemporary & Supernatural Romance

Other

Dev Bentham (WI)
Romance

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L.C. Chase
Mystery, Thriller, Paranormal, Contemporary Romance

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Rhys Ford (CA)
Mystery, Thriller, Romance

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Ginn Hale (PNW)
Fantasy

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Lou Harper (CA)
Paranormal

***

Tobi Hill-Meyer
Non-fiction, Erotica

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Isabella (CA)
Fantasy, Suspense, Romance

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Morticia Knight
Erotica, Romance

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Christopher Moss
Romance, Historical fiction

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M.J. O’Shea (PNW)
Romance, Young Adult

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EE Ottoman
Romance

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JK Pendragon (BC)
Romance, Speculative Fiction

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Alex Powell (BC)
Romance, Science Fiction, Fantasy

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Andrea Speed
Mystery, Thriller, Horror

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Karelia Stetz-Waters
Romance

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Yolanda Wallace
Fiction

 

One Last Thing…

GRNW is releasing a charity anthology of fiction and nonfiction called Magic & Mayhem. Proceeds support future GRNW programming and resources. You can pre-order a copy from Amazon and Smashwords. Release date: September 6, 2016.

Magic and Mayhem

Categories: Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

You Know Me Well – audiobook review

 

You Know Me Well

 

You Know Me Well, an entertaining collaboration from authors Nina LaCour and David Levithan, follows a pair of teenagers as they navigate turning points in their lives at the end of the school year. The story is told in alternating, intertwined narratives through the eyes of high school students Kate and Mark. Although they have sat next to each other in math class all year, the two first really see each other at a bar during San Francisco’s Pride kick-off festivities. Despite being virtual strangers with a recognizable face, the emotional maelstrom of love and the unknown lead Kate and Mark to become instant friends.  It’s a jubilant story of new beginnings, dashed dreams, and evolving relationships. I highly recommend the audiobook version of this story as a great road trip or seaside companion.

If I didn’t already love David Levithan’s storytelling, I would have picked up this title for the sole reason that Emma Galvin narrates Kate’s sections. Previously, I enjoyed her turn as Tris from Divergent, the dystopian YA trilogy by Veronica Roth. She has the type of voice well-suited for playing strong and conflicted young women. If she reads the dictionary next, I’ll be first in line to listen. As Kate, a high school senior standing on the brink of the planned and the unknown, Emma explores the rocky terrain of desire, anxiety, friendship, and more, through skillful narration. The supporting cast of friends, family, and acquaintances are also wonderfully realized by both narrators.

Matthew Brown characterizes Mark, a high school junior in love with his best friend/secret non-boyfriend, so genuinely that I can’t imagine him as any one but Mark (and the other people he voices). Unlike Kate, Mark clings to what he wants, even when Ryan tells him that he just doesn’t feel the same way. Their relationship is complicated and it takes Kate and her outsider’s point-of-view, to help him through it all. Matthew provides nuanced characterization that aptly reflects the struggle Mark is experiencing. When the world feels like it’s falling down around Mark, the listener can’t help but feel it, too. Every awkward moment and new experience feels real.

You can learn more about the authors, narrators, and where to purchase a copy of this audiobook via the links below.

You Know Me Well
Authors: Nina LaCour, David Levithan
Narrators: Emma Galvin, Matthew Brown
Produced by Macmillan Audio
Length: 6 hours, 36 minutes
Release date: June 7, 2016
ISBN: 1427279500

Available as an audiobook from Audible, Audiobook, and Overdrive (check your local public library for availability in both eAudio and CD), as well as many other retailers.

Join the discussion on Goodreads!

Categories: audiobooks, fiction, friendship, lgbt, romance, Uncategorized, young adult | Tags: , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

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